Updated on May 24, 2024
3 min read

Texas Water Fluoride: Updated Statistics

NewMouth is reader supported. We may earn a commission if you purchase something using one of our links. Advertising Disclosure.

Water fluoridation is a critical public health measure that helps prevent tooth decay and promote oral health. In Texas, a significant portion of the population benefits from access to fluoridated water, although the implementation of fluoridation policies varies across the state. This article explores the current state of water fluoridation in Texas, highlighting key statistics and trends.

According to the most recent data, fluoridated water reaches two-thirds of Texans whose homes are connected to public water systems. This coverage aligns with the national average, with 72.7% of the U.S. population on community water systems receiving fluoridated water in 2020. Despite the proven benefits of fluoridation, some cities in Texas have elected to remove fluoride from their water supply in recent years.

  • The percentage of people served by fluoridated public water systems in Texas was 72.7% in 2018, ranking 31st among the states.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that fluoridation reduces cavities by 25% in both children and adults.
  • Texas has naturally high levels of fluoride compared to other states due to oil deposits, rocks, and sediments, with 116 counties supplied by water sources above the recommended concentration.

Access to Fluoridated Water in Texas

The majority of Texans have access to the benefits of fluoridated water.

  • Fluoridated water reaches two-thirds of Texans whose homes are connected to public water systems.
  • In 2018, 72.7% of people served by public water systems in Texas received fluoridated water, ranking the state 31st in the nation.
Output image 1 2

Changes in Fluoridation Coverage Over Time

Texas has seen fluctuations in fluoridation coverage in recent years.

  • The percentage of people served by fluoridated public water systems in Texas was 67.6% in 2016, 79.0% in 2014, and 79.6% in 2012.
  • Despite the proven benefits, some cities in Texas, including San Marcos, College Station, Lago Vista, Alamo Heights, and Elgin City Council, have elected to remove fluoride from their water supply.

Public Health Impact of Fluoridation

Water fluoridation has significant public health benefits for both children and adults.

  • The CDC reports that fluoridation reduces cavities by 25% in both children and adults.
  • Nationally, 72.7% of the U.S. population on community water systems received fluoridated water in 2020, highlighting the widespread recognition of its public health benefits.

Natural Fluoride Levels in Texas

Texas has naturally high levels of fluoride in its water sources compared to other states.

  • Texas has naturally high occurring levels of fluoride due to oil deposits, rocks, and sediments such as granite.
  • 116 counties in Texas are supplied by water sources with fluoride levels above the recommended concentration set by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in 2015.
  • Texas ranks among the top 20 states with the highest naturally occurring fluoride levels in its water sources.

In conclusion, water fluoridation remains a vital public health measure in Texas, with a significant portion of the population benefiting from access to fluoridated water. While coverage levels have fluctuated over the years and some cities have opted to remove fluoride from their water supply, Texas’s fluoridation coverage remains on par with the national average. The state’s naturally high fluoride levels in many counties further contribute to the presence of this important mineral in public drinking water. As the debate surrounding water fluoridation continues, it is crucial to consider the well-established public health benefits and the ongoing need to promote oral health across the state.

Output image 58

Last updated on May 24, 2024
3 Sources Cited
Last updated on May 24, 2024
All NewMouth content is medically reviewed and fact-checked by a licensed dentist or orthodontist to ensure the information is factual, current, and relevant.

We have strict sourcing guidelines and only cite from current scientific research, such as scholarly articles, dentistry textbooks, government agencies, and medical journals. This also includes information provided by the American Dental Association (ADA), the American Association of Orthodontics (AAO), and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).
  1. 2020 Water Fluoridation Statistics.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2020.
  2. Community Water Fluoridation Report.” Texas Oral Health Coalition, accessed 2023.
  3. Fluoride Level Map: Texas.” Waterlogic, accessed 2023.
linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram