Updated on March 15, 2024
2 min read

Michigan Water Fluoride: Updated Statistics

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Water fluoridation has been a crucial public health measure in Michigan for decades, helping to prevent tooth decay and improve oral health across the state. With a high percentage of the population having access to fluoridated water, Michigan has consistently been a leader in this area compared to the national average. Let’s take a closer look at some key statistics and facts about water fluoridation in Michigan.

Michigan’s commitment to water fluoridation is evident in the high percentage of its population that has access to fluoridated water. In 2018, 89.5% of Michigan’s population served by community water systems had access to fluoridated water, significantly above the national average of 72.7% in 2020. This puts Michigan among the top states in the country for water fluoridation coverage.

  • In 2018, 89.5% of Michigan’s population served by community water systems had access to fluoridated water, compared to the national average of 72.7% in 2020.
  • Every dollar spent on fluoridation saves $38 in dental restoration costs, making it a highly cost-effective public health measure.
  • Studies have shown that people in communities with fluoridated water have 20 to 40 percent less tooth decay than those in communities without fluoridated water.

Access to Fluoridated Water Over Time

The percentage of Michigan’s population with access to fluoridated water has remained consistently high over the years.

  • In 2000, 90.7% of Michigan’s population had access to fluoridated water.
  • By 2018, the percentage had stabilized at 89.5%, after slight fluctuations in the intervening years.

Public Health Impact and Economic Benefits

Water fluoridation has been recognized as one of the greatest public health achievements of the 20th century due to its significant impact on oral health and its cost-effectiveness.

  • Studies have demonstrated that people in communities with fluoridated water have 20 to 40 percent less tooth decay than those in communities without fluoridated water.
  • Fluoridation is considered the most cost-effective method of delivering fluoride to all members of a community, regardless of age, educational attainment, or income level.
  • Every dollar spent on fluoridation saves $38 in dental restoration costs, making it a highly economical public health measure.

Support from State Agencies

Although Michigan does not have a state mandate for fluoridation, key state agencies actively support and promote water fluoridation.

  • The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) provides technical and engineering expertise to water systems for permitting and operating fluoridation systems.
  • The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) offers health-related expertise to communities interested in fluoridating their water supplies.

Michigan’s strong commitment to water fluoridation has resulted in a consistently high percentage of its population having access to fluoridated water, well above the national average. This has translated into significant improvements in oral health and substantial economic benefits for the state. With the support of key state agencies, Michigan continues to be a leader in this crucial public health measure.

Last updated on March 15, 2024
5 Sources Cited
Last updated on March 15, 2024
All NewMouth content is medically reviewed and fact-checked by a licensed dentist or orthodontist to ensure the information is factual, current, and relevant.

We have strict sourcing guidelines and only cite from current scientific research, such as scholarly articles, dentistry textbooks, government agencies, and medical journals. This also includes information provided by the American Dental Association (ADA), the American Association of Orthodontics (AAO), and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).
  1. “Fluoridation Information.” Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy.
  2. “Water Fluoridation Statistics – 2018.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2018.
  3. “Community Water Fluoridation.” County Health Rankings & Roadmaps, 2023.
  4. “Water Fluoridation Data & Statistics – 2020.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2020.
  5. “Water Fluoridation Statistics – 2000.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2000.
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